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Chapter II Deka Flexi : Compute

Deka Flexi: Compute is an Infrastructure component of Cloudeka services that allows you to create and run virtual machines on Cloudeka Infrastructure with various types of operating systems, such as Linux (Debian, Ubuntu, Suse, Red Hat, CoreOS) and Windows Server, you can also run your virtual machine with CPU and Memory as needed.

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2.1 Machine Type

Deka Flexi: Compute provides various types of Virtual Machines (VM) which have been classified based on Memory, Storage and Compute types. If you want to create a Virtual machine on Deka Flexi, you must first examine your application and workload system then you be able to select a VM machine based on the available machine types.

The following types of machines are available in Deka Flexi:

General, VM size provides a balanced CPU to memory ratio.

Compute Optimized, Delivers the highest performance CPU on Compute Engine and is optimized for compute intensive workloads.

Memory Optimized, Provides high memory to CPU ratio, optimized for memory-intensive workloads.

Shared, It provides a cost-effective method for running small, non-resource-intensive applications.

2.2 Operating Systems

Deka Flexi provides an open source and closed source based operating system for your application and system platform needed. The following is a list of operating systems provided by Cloudeka:

a. Windows Server, an Enterprise class operating system created specially by Microsoft for use on servers.

Available versions:

  • Windows Server 2016, 2019

b. CentOS, is a free operating system derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Available versions:

  • CentOS 6,7,8

c. OpenSUSE, is a free operating system developed and supported by www.openSUSE.org.

Available versions:

  • Leap-15.2, Leap-15.3, 1.0

d. Red Hat Enterprise Linux, is an enterprise Linux operating system developed by Red Hat for the commercial market.

Available versions:

  • Red Hat 7.6 – 8.4

e. Fedora, a Linux distribution developed by the community supported by the Fedora Project.

Available versions:

  • 34-1.2

f. Debian, is a free and open-source Linux distribution, developed by a supported community Debian Project.

Available versions:

  • 9.13.25, 10.10.1

g. Ubuntu, a linux distribution based on Debian and mostly free and open source, developed and supported by Ubuntu.

Available versions:

  • 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, 20.10, 21.04, 22.04

2.3 Create a VM Instance

This document describe how to create Virtual Machine. Virtual Machine (VM) is a virtual version of a physical computer. Virtual machine software can run programs and operating systems, store data, connect to networks, and do other computing functions.

2.3.1 Prerequisites to Create Instance

Before creating an instance/VM, you need to create a Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) network in Create VPC Network.

2.3.2 Create Instance from public image

Public Image is provided by Cloudeka by default all customers have access to this image and can use it to create instances. The first step in creating a VM instance is to click the Instance menu.

Image 2.1 Instance Page



  • Click the Create Instance button

Image 2.2 Instance Page - Create Instance



  • The Create Instance page will appear. Select Operating System. Then fill in the column Select Operating System by clicking the column Select Operating System, version, bit version.

Image 2.3 Create Instance Page - Select Operating System



  • Select a region to choose where the data center for this VM is like at the TKP (Taman Tekno Park) data center.

Image 2.4 Create Instance Page - Select Region



  • Select VPC Network. If there is no VPC Network, customers can create a VPC first.

Image 2.5 Create Instance Page - Select VPC Network



  • Select Billing Type, for details regarding billing, see the Billing Page.
    • PPU (Pay Per Use),
    • Trial

Image 2.6 Create Instance Page - Select Billing Type



  • Select Choose a plan to determine the type of your VM machine.
    • General, VM size provides a balanced CPU to memory ratio.
    • Compute Optimized, delivers the highest performance CPU on Compute Engine and is optimized for compute intensive workloads.
    • Shared, this provides a cost-effective method for running small applications that are not resource intensive.
    • Memory Optimized, provides high memory to CPU ratio, optimized for memory-intensive workloads.

Image 2.7 Create Instance Page - Select Choose a Plan



  • Select Instance size to determine CPU & RAM on the VM to be created.

Table 2.1 vCPU/RAM


Type Description vCPU/RAM
Shared Based on 1 vCPU 1 vCPU/1GB, 1 vCPU/3GB,1 vCPU/4GB
General CPU:RAM eq 1:2,1:3 2vCPU/4GB, 2vCPU/6GB, 4vCPU/8GB, 4vCPU/12GB, 8vCPU/16GB, 8vCPU/24GB, 16vCPU/32GB, 16vCPU/48GB, 32vCPU/64GB, 32vCPU/96GB
Compute Optimized CPU:RAM eq 1:1 2vCPU/2GB, 4vCPU/4GB, 8vCPU/8GB, 16vCPU/16GB, 32vCPU/32GB
Memory Optimized CPU:RAM eq 1:4 2vCPU/8GB, 2vCPU/16GB, 4vCPU/16GB, 4vCPU/32GB, 8vCPU/32GB, 16vCPU/64GB, 32vCPU/128GB


Image 2.8 Create Instance Page - Instance Size



  • Select Storage type for root disk, for details regarding storage, see the [storage page].
    • Standard Volume SSD with 750 - 2500 IOPS,
    • Premium Volume SSD with 2250 - 4500 IOPS.

Image 2.9 Create Instance Page - Storage Type



  • In the Instance Root disk field, enter or select a size to specify the disk size of your OS. Root disk size minimum 20GB, can not be below 20GB.

Image 2.10 Create Instance Page - Instance Root Disk Size



  • Select Storage type for a data disk, for details regarding the storage, see the [storage page].
    • Standard Volume SSD with 750 - 2500 IOPS,
    • Premium Volume SSD with 2250 - 4500 IOPS.

Image 2.11 Create Instance Page - Data Disk Storage Type



  • Add data disk for additional storage to the VM (beyond root disk/disk os), then click Add button.

Image 2.12 Create Instance Page - Instance Data Disk Size



Image 2.13 Create Instance Page - Add Instance Data Disk Size



Image 2.14 Create Instance Page - List Data Disk



  • Authentication

There are two authentication methods, this authentication is used to login to your virtual machine.

  1. SSH Keys, more secure than standard password. You must create SSH Keys first before you can use this method
    • Choose SSH Keys for the authentication method, then click New SSH Key.

Image 2.15 Create Instance Page - Authentication



  • Paste the Public key that you generated before, type the name for your key, then click Add SSH key

Image 2.16 Create Instance Page - SSH Key



  • Checklist the checkbox of the key that you just added.

Image 2.17 Create Instance Page - Checklist SSH Key



  1. Password, use the standard password for the authentication method.

Image 2.18 Create Instance Page - Password



  • In Instance Name, type your VM name, this instance name is also your VM hostname. Instance Name also can’t contain special characters, put a check mark because you have agreed to Terms of Service then click Create Instance.

Image 2.19 Create Instance Page - Instance Name



  • There will be a notification of process building the Instance.


Image 2.20 Create Instance Page - Build Instance Notification



  • After the building Instance is successful, there will be a success notification “instance (instance name) has been successfully created”

Image 2.21 Create Instance Page - Success Notification



2.3.3 Create Instance from custom image

Custom images are available only to your Cloud project, you need to import your custom images to Cloudeka in Custom Image. Then, use the custom image to create an instance.

  • In the Instance page, click Create Instance button

Image 2.22 Instance Page - Create Instance



  • The Create Instance page will appear. Choose Instance Image.

Image 2.23 Create Instance - Instance Image



  • Select your custom image that you want to use.

Image 2.24 Create Instance - Custom Image



  • Select a region to choose where the data center for this VM is, such as at the TKP (Taman Tekno Park) data center.

Image 2.25 Create Instance - Region



  • Select VPC Network for your Instance.

Image 2.26 Create Instance - VPC Network



  • Select Billing type, for details regarding billing, see the Billing Page.
    • PPU (Pay per use), only instance data
    • PPM (Pay per matrix),
    • Others (category not included in PPU with fixed monthly billing model) displays components such as root disk, data disk, object storage, etc.

Image 2.27 Create Instance - Billing Type



  • Select Choose a plan to determine the type of your VM machine.
    • General, VM size provides a balanced CPU to memory ratio.
    • Compute Optimized, Delivers the highest performance CPU on Compute Engine and is optimized for compute intensive workloads.
    • Shared, This provides a cost-effective method for running small applications that are not resource intensive.
    • Memory Optimized, Provides high memory to CPU ratio, optimized for memory-intensive workloads.

Image 2.28 Create Instance - Choose a Plan



  • Choose the Instance size to determine CPU & RAM resource on the VM to be created.

Table 2.2 vCPU/RAM


Type Description vCPU/RAM
Shared Based on 1 vCPU 1 vCPU/1GB, 1 vCPU/3GB,1 vCPU/4GB
General CPU:RAM eq 1:2,1:3 2vCPU/4GB, 2vCPU/6GB, 4vCPU/8GB, 4vCPU/12GB, 8vCPU/16GB, 8vCPU/24GB, 16vCPU/32GB, 16vCPU/48GB, 32vCPU/64GB, 32vCPU/96GB
Compute Optimized CPU:RAM eq 1:1 2vCPU/2GB, 4vCPU/4GB, 8vCPU/8GB, 16vCPU/16GB, 32vCPU/32GB
Memory Optimized CPU:RAM eq 1:4 2vCPU/8GB, 2vCPU/16GB, 4vCPU/16GB, 4vCPU/32GB, 8vCPU/32GB, 16vCPU/64GB, 32vCPU/128GB

Image 2.29 Create Instance - Instance Size



  • Choose storage type for instance

Image 2.30 Create Instance - Storage Type



  • In the Instance root disk field, you still need enter the size OS disk. But this will not affect the size of your custom image.

Image 2.31 Create Instance - Instance Root Disk



  • Choose volume type and add data disk size for additional storage of your Instance (outside the root disk/disk os).

Image 2.32 Create Instance - Instance Data Disk - Volume Type



Image 2.33 Create Instance - Instance Data Disk - Size



  • Click Add Data Disk button to save the Data Disk.

Image 2.34 Create Instance - Add Data Disk



  • If Data Disk successfully saved, the Data Disk will be added to the list. Click button Delete if you want to delete the Data Disk

Image 2.35 List Data Disk



  • Authentication There are two authentication methods, this authentication is used to login to your virtual machine.
  1. SSH Keys, more secure than standard password. you must create SSH Keys first before you can use this method
    • Choose SSH Keys for authentication method, then click New SSH Key.

Image 2.36 Create Instance - SSH Key



  • Paste the Public key that you generated before, type the name for your key, then click Add SSH Key

Image 2.37 Add New Key - SSH Content



  • Checklist SSH Key of the key that you just added.

Image 2.38 Create Instance - Cheklist SSH Key



  1. Password, use standard password for aunthentication method.

Image 2.39 Create Instance - Password



  • In Instance Name, type your VM name, this instance name is also your VM hostname. Instance Name also can’t contain special character, put a check mark because you have agreed to Terms of Service then click Create Instance.

Image 2.40 Create Instance - Instance Name



  • There will be a notification of process building the Instance.

Image 2.41 Create Instance - Build Instance



  • After building Instance is successful, there will be a success notification “instance (instance name) has been successfully created”

Image 2.42 Create Instance - Notification



2.4 Details Instance

This document explains how to view instance details such as CPU usage, RAM usage, private IP address, gateway, floating IP, and more. Here’s how to view instance details.

  • Click on an Instance Name

Image 2.43 Instance Page



  • On the instance detail page you will see the details of CPU Usage, RAM Usage, Network In Usage, Network Out Usage, Disk Read, and Disk Write.

Image 2.44 Detail Instance - CPU Usage



Image 2.45 Detail Instance - RAM Usage



Image 2.46 Detail Instance - Network In Usage



Image 2.47 Detail Instance - Network Out Usage



Image 2.48 Detail Instance - Disk Read



Image 2.49 Detail Instance - Disk Write



2.4.1 Reboot Instance

To reboot the instance, you can do 2 reboots of which Soft Reboot is used to slowly restart your VM system by stopping all running processes one by one while Hard Reboot is used to force restart the system when your instance is already showing no response.

  • To get Soft Reboot and Hard Reboot, click the Power menu. Can be seen in the menu section Reboot

Image 2.50 Power Page - Reboot Menu



  • To restart the VM system by stopping all running processes one by one, click the Soft Reboot button, while to restart the VM system by force stopping click the Hard Reboot button.

Image 2.51 Reboot Menu- Soft Reboot & Hard Reboot



  • A confirmation window will appear to do Reboot. Then click Yes.

Image 2.52 Reboot Menu - Confirmation Window



  • There is a Restarting the instance notification that your VM is being restarted.

Image 2.53 Restart Process Notification



  • If your VM is successfully restarted there will be a notification Instance [your-instance name] has been successfully restarted

Image 2.54 Restart Successful Notification



2.5 Connect to VM Instance

This document describe how to connect to a vm instance. you can access it securely from your computer using Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) for Windows Server instance or Secure Shell (SSH) for Linux instance or Cloudeka portal, here’s how to access it.

2.5.1 Prerequisites Connect to VM Instance

Before you connect, make sure the following prerequisites are met:

  • Your vm instance has a Public IP/Floating IP, if you want access from public.

  • Your Cloudeka Firewall rule allows TCP inbound traffic from your client’s public IP address to your instance using port 3389 for Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) & port 22 for Secure Shell (SSH).

2.5.2 Connect to VM Instance via Cloudeka Portal

This menu explains how to connect to the virtual machine using Cloudeka Console. Access to the console in the following way, on the Instance page in the Action column, click More then select Access Console.

Image 2.55 Instance Page - Access Console



  • Customers will be directed to the following page.

Image 2.56 Login VM Page



2.5.3 Connect to Windows VM Instance via RDP (Remote Desktop)

This menu describes how to connect to a Windows Virtual Machine Instance by using RDP. Access to RDP in the following way.

  • On your computer, open the Remote Desktop Connection application or you can use a third party tool such as mRemoteNG or another tool.

Image 2.57 Remote Desktop Connection



  • Type the Public IP Address of the VM you want to remote/access, then click Connect.


Image 2.58 Remote Desktop Connection - Connect



  • Fill in your VM credential, then click ok.


Image 2.59 Credential Form



  • A certificate will appear for connection verification, click Yes.


Image 2.60 Security Certificate



  • Now you can access your VM.


Image 2.61 VM Page



2.5.4 Connect to Linux VM Instance via SSH

If you are using Windows, you will have to use a third party tool. The following instructions show how to connect to a Linux VM using PuTTY.

  • Open PuTTY on your computer.


Image 2.62 PuTTY



  • In the Host Name field, enter the Public IP Address of the VM you want to connect to, as well as the port number if you are using your VM’s custom port, then click Open.


Image 2.63 PuTTY Configuration



  • If this is your first time using PuTTY to login to your VM with SSH, there is a warning similar to the following, click Accept.


Image 2.64 PuTTY Security Alert



  • After you receive the warning, the terminal asks for your username and password. Type in your Username and Password, then press Enter.


Image 2.65 Terminal



2.5.5 Connect to Linux VM Instance Using SSH Key

If you using Windows, you must use a third-party tools. The following instructions show how to connect to Linux VM using PuTTY with SSH key.

  • Open PuTTY on your computer.


2.66 PuTTY



  • In the Host Name field, enter the Public IP Address of the VM that you want to connect, also the port number.


Image 2.67 PuTTY Configuration - Host and Port



  • In the category list, Expand SSH and click Auth.


Image 2.68 PuTTY Configuration - SSH



  • Click Browser, choose private key that you saved before. Then click Open.


Image 2.69 PuTTY Configuration - Browse




Image 2.70 PuTTY Configuration - Private



  • After that, click open to connect to your VM Instance.


Image 2.71 PuTTY Configuration - Open



  • It will be open the login session to your VM.


Image 2.72 Login VM



  • Try login with user root and enter your passphrase key.


Image 2.73 Login VM - Type User Root and Passphrase



  • If there is a notification “Please login as the user “centos” rather than the user “root””, so you only can login using “centos” user.


Image 2.74 Login VM - Login User



  • Please try login using “centos” user, now you can login to your VM instance.


Image 2.75 Login VM Instance



2.6 Resize Instance

You can change the existing machine type if it doesn’t suit the workload you are running on the VM. You can change the VM machine type to match the amount of vCPU and memory as your workload changes.


Image 2.76 Instance Page



  • In the Action column, click More, then select Resize Instance.


Image 2.77 Instance Page - Resize Instance



  • Select the machine type and adjust the cpu and memory as needed, then click the Resize button.
    • General, VM size provides a balanced CPU to memory ratio.
    • Compute Optimized, delivers the highest performance CPU on Compute Engine and is optimized for compute intensive workloads.
    • Shared, this provides a cost-effective method for running small applications that are not resource intensive.
    • Memory Optimized, provides high memory to CPU ratio, optimized for memory-intensive workloads.

Table 2.3 vCPU/RAM


Type Description vCPU/RAM
Shared Based on 1 vCPU 1 vCPU/1GB, 1 vCPU/3GB,1 vCPU/4GB
General CPU:RAM eq 1:2,1:3 2vCPU/4GB, 2vCPU/6GB, 4vCPU/8GB, 4vCPU/12GB, 8vCPU/16GB, 8vCPU/24GB, 16vCPU/32GB, 16vCPU/48GB, 32vCPU/64GB, 32vCPU/96GB
Compute Optimized CPU:RAM eq 1:1 2vCPU/2GB, 4vCPU/4GB, 8vCPU/8GB, 16vCPU/16GB, 32vCPU/32GB
Memory Optimized CPU:RAM eq 1:4 2vCPU/8GB, 2vCPU/16GB, 4vCPU/16GB, 4vCPU/32GB, 8vCPU/32GB, 16vCPU/64GB, 32vCPU/128GB


Image 2.78 Resize Instance Page




Image 2.79 Resize Instance Page



  • If the data has been successfully changed, there will be a notification “Instance flavor has been successfully changed”.


Image 2.80 Resize Instance - Successful Notification



2.7 Resize Root Disk

You can increase the disk root size when your VM instance needs additional storage space. You can only resize the root disk to increase its size, you cannot reduce the size of the root disk.


Image 2.81 Instance Page



  • In the Action column, click More, then select Resize Root Disk.


Image 2.82 Instance Page - Resize Root Disk



  • Enter the size of Root Disk as needed, but the root disk cannot be below 20GB. then click Resize Root Disk to save or cancel if you don’t change the size of the root disk.


Image 2.83 Instance Page - Increase Root Disk Size



  • There will be a process of expanding the size of the root disk.


Image 2.84 Instance Page - Process Increase Root Disk



  • New data that has been saved is automatically updated in the Instance list


Image 2.85 Instance Page



2.8 Create SSH Keys for Auth method

SSH key for authentication method more secure than standard password, if you want use SSH key for authentication you need to create the key first, follow instructions below to create SSH key.

  • In this tutorial we use PuTTYgen for generate the key. on your Windows computer open PuTTYgen program.


Image 2.86 PuTTYgen



  • In PuTTY Key Generator window, please make sure type of key to generate is RSA, then click Generate.


Image 2.87 PuTTY Key Generator



  • After you click the Generate button, move your mouse in the area below the progress bar.


Image 2.88 PuTTY Key Generator - Progress Bar



  • When the progress bar is full, PuTTYgen generates you key pair.


Image 2.89 PuTTY Key Generator - Key Pair



  • Type a passphrase in the Key passphrase field. Type the same passphrase in the Confirm passphrase field. you can use a key without a passphrase, but this is not recommended.


Image 2.90 PuTTY Key Generator - Key Passphrase



  • Click the Save Private Key button to save the private key. You must save the private key, you will need it to connect to your VM instance.


Image 2.91 PuTTY Key Generator - Save Private Key



  • Right-click in the text field labeled Public Key for pasting into OpenSSH authorized keys file and choose Select All.


Image 2.92 PuTTY Key Generator - Public Key



  • Right-click again in the same text field and choose Copy.


Image 2.93 PuTTY Key Generator - Public Key - Copy



  • Paste it on the SSH Key Content field in the steps create vm instance using SSH Key for authentication method.


Image 2.94 PuTTY Key Generator - SSH Key Content



2.9 Delete VM Instance

This menu describe how to delete Instance.

2.9.1 Prerequisites to Delete VM Instance

Before deleting an Instance/VM, you need to unassign the following services first:

2.9.2 Delete Instance

  • The following is a list of VM instance contained in the application, for example i.e. Centos-Test.


Image 2.95 Instance Page



  • In the Action column, click More, then click Delete Instance.


Image 2.96 Instance Page - Delete Instance



  • Click Delete Instance to delete or Cancel if you don’t want to delete the VM instance


Image 2.97 Delete Instance



  • Deleted VM instance data no longer appears in the instance list.


Image 2.98 Instance Page



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